MS News Briefs

walking

Three Weeks of Rehabilitation Improves Walking Ability in MS, Study Finds

Rehabilitation for 3 weeks improves the walking capacity of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who have moderate to severe walking disability, according to an exploratory, observational study published in PLoS One. However, it does not affect physical activity.   “To increase physical activity, it may be necessary to add specific behavioral interventions to the rehabilitation…

Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

Intranasal Foralumab Linked With Clinical Improvements in Patient With MS

A second patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) showed clinical improvements following intranasal foralumab treatment, according to a press release from Tiziana Life Sciences.  The investigators reported that the treatment improved the gait stability and endurance of the patient who had nonactive secondary progressive MS (SPMS) and received a total of 10.5 treatment cycles of foralumab…

steps

Fast Velocity Concentric Resistance Training Yields Benefits for Patients With MS

Lower body fast velocity concentric resistance training helped patients with multiple sclerosis walk more easily and with less catastrophic pain and symptomatic fatigue, according to a randomized controlled trial. The results showed that following fast velocity concentric resistance training, the maximum isometric voluntary contraction and hand grip strength increased for all participants.  Moreover, the improvements…

multiple sclerosis testing

Off-Label Immunotherapies Yield Similar Efficacy as Drugs Approved for Progressive MS

Off-label high-efficacy immunotherapies, like rituximab, natalizumab, and fingolimod, had comparable efficacy to on-label prescription drugs for progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a network meta-analysis suggests. The results showed the median Expanded Disability Severity Scale (EDSS) risk of progression was 35% in the placebo group and 30% in the immunotherapy group at 2 years, reported Guilherme Diogo…

Epstein-Barr virus

Infectious Mononucleosis Associated With Increased Incidence of Multiple Sclerosis

A new study has determined that infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which causes infectious mononucleosis, is associated with a higher incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS), particularly among younger individuals. The study, published in Frontiers of Immunology, provides further evidence of EBV involvement in the pathophysiology of MS. “In order to further dissect the association between…

Multiple sclerosis graphic

How Quickly Is Multiple Sclerosis Reactivated After Cessation of Therapy?

The rate of disease reactivation after the cessation of therapies is different among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study published in Neurology. The peak of relapse activity occurs after 1 to 10 months.  “These results suggest that untreated intervals should be minimized after stopping anti-trafficking therapies (natalizumab and fingolimod),” the authors…

NORD banners

Rare Disease Patients and Advocate to Headline NORD Conference in October

Two rare disease patients and a rare disease advocate will be the keynote speakers at the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) 2022 annual rare disease conference, being held at the Marriott Marquis in Washington, DC, on October 17 and 18, 2022.   NORD announced the keynote speakers as Brittany Clayborne, MS, PsyD, a post-transplant…

cognitive function

Rituximab May Benefit Cognition in Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

Researchers found that rituximab resulted in improved cognitive function in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, according to a study published in the Caspian Journal of Internal Medicine. One of the most severe impairments caused by multiple sclerosis is cognitive, which often manifests as slower information processing speed. The rate and severity of cognitive impairment…

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