Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) who survived for 5 years or more had better lung function and quality of life compared to those who survived for less than 5 years, according to a study published in the Chest journal and being presented at the Chest 2021 Annual Meeting. 

They were also less likely to be using supplemental oxygen at enrollment, according to the authors. The patients were enrolled in the IPF-PRO registry for the study.

This finding suggests that discussions about disease prognosis with IPF patients should reflect that the disease has a variable course, and patients with less advanced disease may survive for more than 5 years.


Continue Reading

Read more about IPF prognosis

In order to assess the characteristics of IPF patients who did and did not survive for at least 5 years, the team of researchers used data from the IPF-PRO registry, which is a multicenter US registry of patients with the disease.

A total of 488 patients were analyzed. Of these, 267 survived for 5 years or more. The median age of patients at enrollment was 71 for those who survived for 5 years or more, and 73 for those who survived for less than 5 years.

The majority of patients were male regardless of how long they survived (73.5% for those who survived for 5 years or more and 76.5% for those who survived for less than 5 years). 

A lower proportion of patients who survived for 5 years or more were former smokers, used supplemental oxygen at enrollment, or had been hospitalized in the year before enrollment.

Moreover, patients who survived for 5 years or more had greater median FVC and DLco, as well as better quality of life at enrollment compared to patients who survived for less than 5 years.

The Chest 2021 Annual Meeting is being held virtually Oct. 17-20, 2021.

Reference

Kim H, Bender S, Patel N, et al. Characteristics of long-term survivors with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: data from the IPF-PRO registry. Chest. 2021;160(4):A1251. doi:10.1016/j.chest.2021.07.1146